Cireson Software Asset Management – Tracking Operating Systems

The question of tracking Operating Systems within the Cireson Asset Management solution came up the other day and I thought I’d put together a quick blog post to cover off why we would do this and more importantly how.

Why Track OS Versions in Asset Management?

First off, I think it is important to ask yourself why you would want to track Operating Systems within your organisation as it might not give you any useful metrics or data that would be useful in any way to us.

For example: If your organisation has an Enterprise Agreement with Microsoft that covers Windows for all of your PC’s then why do we need to report on it? If we know for sure that we are covered regardless of what version of the OS is used, then there is no useful reports that we can gain about licensing of OS’s.

However, we could get some reports about how our upgrades are going or if a particular threat is seen for a specific OS we could quickly report on what our exposure would be.

So the first thing that you really need to do is determine if it is worth tracking Operating Systems before investing time and effort in to setting these up.

How to Track OS Versions in Asset Management

If we have decided to track OS versions then we need to make sure we cover all OS’s that we want to track by creating Software Assets for each of the branches that we want to track.

For Example: If you are wanting to track just major versions (Windows 7, 8, 10) then it is possible to create a Software Asset for each of these without needing to go any lower level.

However, if you are trying to ensure workstations are up-to-date, then you will have to create a software asset for each SKU of Windows OS (e.g. Windows 10 Home, Windows 10 Enterprise)

Once all individual OS’s are tracked then I would also suggest creating two Software asset called “All Windows Desktop OS’s” and “All Windows Server OS’s”. These will have bundle rules for all of the OS’s so you can track licensing if you have a limited number of OS Licenses.

Below is a list of OS’s that could be tracked, but it would be up to the individual as to which ones to use.

Server OS’s

Microsoft Windows Server 2003 Enterprise Edition R2
Microsoft Windows Server 2003 Standard Edition
Microsoft Windows Server 2003 Standard Edition R2
Microsoft Windows Server 2003 Web Edition
Microsoft Windows Server 2008 Enterprise
Microsoft Windows Server 2008 R2 Enterprise
Microsoft Windows Server 2008 R2 Standard
Microsoft Windows Server 2008 Standard
Microsoft Windows Server 2012 Datacenter
Microsoft Windows Server 2012 R2 Datacenter
Microsoft Windows Server 2012 R2 Standard
Microsoft Windows Server 2012 Standard
Windows Server 2016 Datacenter
Windows Server 2016 Standard

Desktop OS’s

Microsoft Windows 10 Enterprise
Microsoft Windows 10 Pro
Microsoft Windows 7 Enterprise
Microsoft Windows 7 Professional
Microsoft Windows 7 Ultimate
Windows 7 Enterprise
Windows 7 Professional
Windows 7 Ultimate
Microsoft Windows 8 Enterprise
Microsoft Windows 8 Professional
Microsoft Windows 8.1 Enterprise
Microsoft Windows 8.1 Professional
Microsoft Windows Vista
Windows XP Professional

How to Enter OS Versions in Asset Management

Now all you have to do is enter these in the Cireson Asset Management and we are done right?

Not so fast.

We have a few options to play with here including an option that is “This is an OS”. Seems fairly obvious that we would select this right?

Not so much.

This option looks in a separate location of the ConfigMgr data instead of the Add or Remove Programs list, But the Windows OS is also recorded in the Add or Remove Programs list and can often have more detail, so it is better not to use this option.

Entering Software Assets one at a time can be a challenge and take a lot of time, so to make it easier, here is an Excel file filled with all the information you need to make this happen by importing via Cireson Asset Import, or Cireson Asset Excel.

ciresonosassets

Happy reporting.

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